LA Screenwriter

A new article in Nature.com discusses a study that shows scientific papers that are initially rejected ultimately have a greater impact in the long run:

Just had your paper rejected? Don’t worry — that might boost its ultimate citation tally. An excavation of scientific papers’ usually hidden prepublication trajectories from journal to journal has found that papers published after having first been rejected elsewhere receive significantly more citations on average than ones accepted on first submission.

Of course, scientific papers aren’t screenplays, but the trend holds true.

Rejection is an essential part of the writing process. Your ideas, your individual scenes, and your lines of dialogue will all be picked at and turned down countless times before your screenplay is ultimately accepted. But those mini and major rejections shouldn’t get you down — they should empower you to learn from what you’ve done so far and press forward.

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About jpdailing

Author and dabbler in nerdy-type stuff. I like cat, red pens, avoid cliches like the plague, and suck at these kinds of bios. View all posts by jpdailing

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